True Will and Word of Thelema

This is Esoteric Thelema: The Will is esoteric. Effect, appearance, is exoteric. ‘True Will’ in its full expression may be written in Egyptian hieroglyphs thus:

True Will in Egyptian HieroglyphsThe Greek word ‘Thelema’, through its number 93, is equal to Agape, ‘love’. The ancient Egyptian word for ‘will’ or ‘desire’ is the same word used for the verb ‘to love’.[1] True Will is spelled here with the sickle-ma Lion of Truth determinative. The phonetic ‘m’ is glyphed by the twilight owl of Sophia that calls the soul to resurrection. The sealed scroll is the esoteric determinative, indicative of ‘secret or hidden things’. The word, mer-t, is pronounced, meret. On the reverse side of the Stele of Revealing, it is declared,

Ankh-af-na-khonsu shall go forth in the light, bearing the lamp and staff of Thelema among the living souls that dwell upon the earth.[2]

The root of the word, mer, forms countless words in the ancient Egyptian language. Many more are found in other languages, both ancient and modern. Mer has every meaning of flowing like a river, or watery as a lake. It is life giving, the animating will. It is a light-flowing stream, a transmission or communicative path. It is the Song of Songs, the vibration of love and life. It is the compass of every book of spells ever written. The word embraces love in all its forms. Merut means, ‘sweetheart’ or ‘beloved woman’. Merit is desire itself, the flame arising in void space. Mera is a ‘lover’ or ‘friend’, denoting (in prayer) the Holy Guardian Angel.

True Will and the Temple Priestess

In Latin, the word merus, mera or merum has the meaning of ‘unmixed wine’, denoting purity. The (Egyptian) Book of the Law, Liber AL, I: 44 states,

For pure will, unassuaged of purpose, delivered from the lust of result, is every way perfect.

The word also has the meaning of ‘bare’, ‘unadorned’—naked as truth herself. Ironically, over time the feminine noun, meratrix, came to mean ‘courtesan’ or ‘harlot’. When religious patriarchs usurped the rôle of the priestesses, all women were thrown out of the temples and subjected to slavery or prostitution.[3]

The Egyptian word for the True Will, mer-t, was anciently used as the highly respected title of priestesses serving at the temple of Tahuti (Thoth) in Khemenu (Hermopolis), the ‘City of the Eight’. The name refers to the Ogdoad of primal gods arising from the watery abyss called the nun. The principal deities of Khemenu were Set-Typhon and Tahuti, the resurrection word-bird and god of scribes. Set-Typhon was depicted at Khemenu in the form of a hippopotamus, upon which was a hawk fighting with a serpent. The hippopotamus or ‘river horse’ was also sacred to Hathoor, as its great bulk and semi-aquatic domain keys in to the foundations of the universe, perceived as the hub or axis about which the constellations revolve.

As the word of Will, Love and Truth, mer-t has a close association with Ma’at, goddess of Truth and Justice. We can spell ‘Lion of Truth’, incorporating Ma’at and Zain the Sword, Upholder of Truth, in hieroglyphics.

True Will of Maat, 93Two of the hieroglyphs are determinatives, so there is no need to add a number value. The sickle can be given the value of 30, as it is the original lamed, ‘L’. The phonetic ‘T’ (half circle) can be given the value of 9. Therefore, when spelled in hieroglyphs, Ma’at has the value of 93. The original title of the Book of the Law is thus apt, for ‘L’ (30) spells out the Book of Ma’at, the book of her occult lore.


Notes

1. See Budge, An Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Volume I, pp. 309–10.
2. The translation is from ‘New Light on Stele 666’, Babalon Unveiled! Thelemic Monographs, pp. 43.
3. See ‘Fall and Resurrection of Babalon’,  Babalon Unveiled! Thelemic Monographs.

© Oliver St. John 2019

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